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The Greek Super Food that's Figs, since ancient times

Posted by moodhacker on June 19, 2019 at 12:20 AM




In Ancient Greek times, figs were an essential part of the everyday diet, and were enjoyed along with other fruits such as apples and reportedly used as a substitute for bread, scholars of the Ancient Greek lifestyle report .

Greek islanders would press the figs to change the texture and make figs stodgier. Meanwhile, fig leaves were used to wrap around fish, according to archaeology findings .

 

Figs were widely known in the greater area of Mediterranean since the ancient times; thought to have been first cultivated in Egypt and then spread to Crete and Ancient Greece.


The fruits were considered so valuable that it was illegal to export them.


Figs by the Ancient Greek "Consume Greek' ideology 

 

Bread, Wine and Olive Oil, were primarily the three fundamentals were the most important ingredients for the Ancient Greek:  This was part of the dietary model or what we can call food ideology. For the Greeks these foods represented frugality and the simple life along with honey and figs.

It is thought that this represented loyalty to their country since these fundamental foods were produced in Greece and therefore it was not necessary to import rare luxury type foods, they were happy with their own. It also is thought that it had to do with areas that should be conquered; anywhere that olives and vines grew should be conquered and be Greek.


(by https://www.slideshare.net/christinakas/superfoods-in-ancient-greece)

Nowadays one of the  largest producers of figs worldwide is Greece.


The fruits are rich in calcium, potassium (a mineral that helps to control high blood pressure), dietary fibre (positive effect on weight management) and manganese (known for its cardiovascular effects).


It is among the richest in fibre fruits, protective against post-menopausal breast cancer and their leaves have insulin lowering properties.


Dried figs can be enjoyed throughout the year and stay fresh for several months. They are best kept in room temperature in a cool and dry place wrapped well.


If you wish to revive them, soak them in boiling water or lightly steam them.


They’re wonderful when chopped, mixed with other dried fruits, nuts and spices, added to tea-breads and cakes or stewed, flavoured with anise and fennel


Benefits of both fresh & dried figs

Figs have a similar function in the body as cereal; their high fibre content promotes healthy bowel function and their high vitamin B content is essential for intestinal regulation.


  • The mineral content of figs closely resembles that of human milk and gram for gram they contain twice as much calcium as cows milk.
  • Dried figs are rich in fibre, potassium, calcium, magnesium and iron.
  • They are a good source of potassium which is important in helping to regulate blood pressure.
  • The soluble fibre, called pectin, in figs may help reduce blood cholesterol.
  • Figs are loaded in vitamins A, B1 and B2 as well as phosphorus, manganese, sodium and chlorine;
  • Due to the high levels of fibre. Figs are amongst the most highly alkaline foods, making them useful in balancing the pH levels of the body.
  • They are high in natural and simple sugars and are a good alternative to sugar.


Tips for adding Figs to your Diet


  • Keep dried figs in your handbag and have them as a healthy energy snack whenever needed.
  • For extra flavour and nutrients, stuff them with nuts and drizzle with a little raw honey.
  • Add figs either dry or fresh to oatmeal or cereal.
  • Add chopped figs to salads or savoury dishes.
  • Just pick some straight off a fig tree and eat all if it, including the skin!







sources :theculturetrip.com,.greece10best.com, greekcitytimes.com, www.olivetomato.com/food-and-eating-ancient-greece-vs-modern-greece/

Categories: Eat Healthy In Greece, Recipes you will only find in Greece , Greece Wonderland

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